Archive for 'ICD-10'

Here’s What You Can Do to Get Ready for ICD-10

Posted on 23. Oct, 2013 by .

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Question: What should we be doing now to prepare for the ICD-10 transition?

Answer: Your ICD-10 preparations should be focusing on both coding training and process changes at this point.

Don’t wait until the last minute to get started with training. If you’re unsure of where to start, get an ICD-10 book and begin browsing the codes to get a feel for them and their format. You may be surprised at the similarities to ICD-9. Many coders are happy to find that the new code system isn’t as scary as they feared.

ICD-10 SPECIALTY TOP DIAGNOSES
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Reader Question: Consider ICD-10 Options for CHF Patient

Posted on 09. Oct, 2013 by .

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Question: Our patient has a principal diagnosis of congestive heart failure (CHF). She also has coronary artery disease (CAD), hypertension (HTN) and emphysema. She is using oxygen intermittently. How should we code for her?

 Delaware Subscriber

 Answer: List the following diagnoses for this patient:

  • 428.0 (Congestive heart failure, unspecified);
  • 492.8 (Other emphysema);
  • 401.9 (Unspecified Essential hypertension);
  • 414.00 (Coronary atherosclerosis; of unspecified type of vessel, native or graft); and
  • V46.2 (Dependence on supplemental oxygen).

Your patient’s principal diagnosis is CHF, you don’t have additional details about this diagnosis, so 428.0 for CHF unspecified is your first-listed code.

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Broader Reporting Options For Anorectal Abscess

Posted on 25. Sep, 2013 by .

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Hint: Use separate code when you clinician diagnoses anal and rectal abscesses.

When your family physician diagnoses an abscess in the anorectal area, you’ll need to delve deeper into documentation to check the location of the abscess to report it accurately using ICD-10 codes.

When your family physician arrives at a diagnosis of an abscess in the anal and/or rectal area, you will have to report it with 566 (Abscess of anal and rectal regions) when using ICD-9 codes. Remember that the same code is used, regardless of the location.

Select From 5 Codes Depending on Abscess Type

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Continue to Focus on Gangrene and Obstruction to Untangle Umbilical Hernia Diagnoses

Posted on 10. Sep, 2013 by .

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ICD-10 keeps 3 code choices for you.

When your anesthesiologist is involved with a case to correct an umbilical hernia, you start your diagnosis selection by verifying the presence or absence of obstruction or gangrene.

ICD-9: You currently have three code choices for umbilical hernia:

  • 551.1 (Umbilical hernia with gangrene)
  • 552.1 (Umbilical hernia with obstruction)
  • 553.1 (Umbilical hernia without obstruction or gangrene).

ICD-10: When you begin using ICD-10 codes on Oct.1, 2014, the base code for a diagnosis of umbilical hernia will change to K42 (Umbilical hernia).

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Z45.0- Will Help You Report Cardiac Device Encounters Next Year

Posted on 22. Aug, 2013 by .

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Prepare to distinguish between pacemaker battery and other parts.

ICD-10 will require you to be a little more specific about coding pacemaker adjustment encounters, but you should have an easier transition to coding automatic implantable cardiac defibrillator (AICD) encounters.

ICD-9-CM Codes:

V53.31, Fitting and adjustment of cardiac pacemaker

V53.32, Fitting and adjustment of automatic implantable cardiac defibrillator

V53.39, Fitting and adjustment of other cardiac device

ICD-10-CM Codes:

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870-897 Open Wound Options Explode to S00-S99 ICD-10 Categories

Posted on 12. Aug, 2013 by .

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Expect more detail for wound type, location.

If you thought ICD-9 provided a lot of granularity for reporting open wounds, think again. You won’t believe the detail you’ll need to document when ICD-10 goes into effect on Oct. 1, 2014.

Describe Cut’s Nature

Although the ICD-9 codes primarily use the terms “open wound” or “laceration,” you’ll need to have more information to describe the wound under ICD-10. For instance, the ICD-10 codes often distinguish laceration, puncture wound, and open bite using different codes.

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I49.3 Gives Ventricular Premature Beats Their Own Code in 2014

Posted on 30. Jul, 2013 by .

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Term swap: ICD-10 uses ‘depolarization’ instead of ‘beats.’

Many Part B practices see patients with premature heartbeat disorders, so you may have those diagnosis codes at the top of your mind. But in your preparations for ICD-10, pay attention to two key premature beat coding changes to ensure clear sailing for your claims.

ICD-9-CM Codes:

  • 427.60, Premature beats unspecified
  • 427.61, Supraventricular premature beats
  • 427.69, Other premature beats

  ICD-10-CM Codes :

  • I49.1, Atrial premature depolarization
  • I49.3, Ventricular premature depolarization
  • I49.40, Unspecified premature depolarization
  • I49.49, Other premature depolarization

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No Need to Stick Your Neck Out When Choosing Chronic Neck Pain Code in 2014

Posted on 16. Jul, 2013 by .

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ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes share a common descriptor.

Chronic pain the neck is a common diagnosis you may be reporting. The good news is that ICD-10 transition will offer no additional challenges for reporting neck pain. You’ll have a simple one-to-one match in ICD-10.

When your surgeon makes a diagnosis of chronic neck pain, you report 723.1 (Cervicalgia) in ICD-10. Your choice will remain simple in ICD-10, when you’ll make an easy switch to M54.2 (Cervicalgia). Diagnosis M54.2 falls under the category “Other Dorsopathies; Dorsalgia.”

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Focus Your Practice’s ICD-10 Prep With CMS Resources

Posted on 26. Jun, 2013 by .

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Don’t miss partial code freeze breather.

The countdown to ICD-10 stands at just over a year, so now is a great time to take a break from focusing on new diagnosis codes and zero in on the transition details your surgery practice needs to know.

We’ve gathered some resources that can help you make sure you’re ready when ICD-10 goes into effect on Oct. 1, 2014.

Make a Clean Transition

You might think you’re ready to go with ICD-10, but you can’t get a jump start on the system.

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Don’t Let Your 2014 “Anxiety” Diagnosis Make You Anxious

Posted on 14. Jun, 2013 by .

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You have a one-to-one correlation, but you do have a descriptor change.

 “Anxiety” is a general term for avoidance-prone disorders. This includes feelings of dread with apparent object or cause. Symptoms include irritability, anxious expectations, or phobias.

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