Archive for 'ICD-10'

ICD-10: Ebola Diagnosis: A Code You Hope You Never Need, But Should Know How to Report

Posted on 12. Feb, 2015 by .

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Contact with and suspected exposure codes are also relevant in Ebola outbreaks

Ebola Virus cases have been everywhere in the news recently and focusing a lot of attention of emergency departments. The medical team has to get the diagnosis right to appropriately treat the patient and prevent widespread exposure to the community. As a coder, you must get the diagnosis code right, as well, for both tracking purposes and accurate payment for services rendered.

Consider this scenario: A 42 year-old health care worker comes to the ED because of a low grade fever. He had recently returned from a medical mission where he was caring for patients who had Ebola Virus Disease (EVD). There are no other symptoms and the patient is medically stable. Based on current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and your local health department’s guidelines, the patient will be admitted to a special quarantine unit. What diagnosis codes should you use for the ED encounter? (more…)

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ICD-10: Get to Know CMS’s ICD-10 Guideline Updates

Posted on 28. Jan, 2015 by .

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Some revisions may actually seem very familiar. 

Even though you still have another year before ICD-10 goes in to effect, that doesn’t mean CMS has stopped preparing for the new diagnosis coding system. In fact, the agency recently released a transmittal that should help you clarify some of the rules surrounding how you’ll report these codes when insurers start requiring them on Oct. 1, 2015.

Changes Match ICD-9 Guidelines

CMS issued Transmittal 3020 on Aug. 8, and it announces revisions to the official ICD-10 Coding Guidelines which put them more in line with the current ICD-9 rules. For example, CMS revised the ICD-10 regs to now say, “Do not code diagnoses documented as ‘probable,’ ‘suspected,’ ‘questionable,’ ‘rule out,’ or ‘working diagnosis’ or other similar terms indicating uncertainty. Rather, code the condition(s) to the highest degree of certainty for that encounter/visit, such as symptoms, signs, abnormal test results, or other reasons for the visit.”

Here’s why: (more…)

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Dermatology: Don’t Get Zapped When Radiation-Related Disorders Codes Change

Posted on 14. Jan, 2015 by .

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In 2015, look for debut of the L57.- codes.

In the Dermatology Coding Alert volume 10 number 10, we looked at how ICD-10 would change diagnosis coding for sunburn and other solar radiation-related skin conditions. This time, we’ll examine how your coding will change effective Oct. 1, 2015, for skin disorders caused by other sources of radiation.

ICD-10 contains a category of diagnoses relating to “Skin changes due to chronic exposure to nonionizing radiation,” which will map to ICD-9 codes that are now scattered among different sections. The new ICD-10 category, L57.-, consists of: (more…)

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ICD-10: Can You Code This Pediatric Note Using Only ICD-10 Codes?

Posted on 18. Dec, 2014 by .

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Determine whether you’ll be ready for the new coding system with this sample note.

Although you’re probably a professional at coding your pediatric documentation at this point using ICD-9 codes, chances are high that you haven’t yet coded a note using only ICD-10 codes. Test yourself using this documentation example to determine whether you can select the right diagnosis codes, which will be required as of Oct. 1. Determine which ICD-10 codes you would report, then read on for the answers.

Scenario: An eight-year-old established patient presents for a well child visit. While there, the patient’s mother says that the child has recently needed to use his asthma inhaler twice a week, which has limited his activities of daily living to a slight extent, including his need to sit on the bleachers during his physical education class. Although the patient has had mild persistent asthma for a while, this is the first exacerbation that the parent has reported. Which ICD-10 codes should you report for this visit? (more…)

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ICD-10: Look to H10 Series for Conjunctivitis in 2015

Posted on 10. Dec, 2014 by .

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Hint: In many cases, an additional digit will specify which eye is infected.

When ICD-9 becomes ICD-10 in 2015, you’ll have to be prepared for changes across the board when it comes to diagnosis coding. Often, you’ll have more options that may require tweaking the way you document services and a coder reports it. Check out the following examples of how ICD-10 will change your coding options.

Get ready now: The deadline for using ICD-10 is Oct. 1, 2015.

Nail Down These Upcoming Eye Infection Coding Changes

Conjunctivitis is an eye infection that can affect patients of all ages, and your practice is probably familiar with the signs and symptoms of this condition. But, like all other conditions, conjunctivitis will fall under new codes under ICD-10. (more…)

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ICD-10-CM: Ask Cardiologist to Specify Insufficiency, Prolapse, or Stenosis for Your Mitral ICD-10 Code

Posted on 26. Nov, 2014 by .

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Not sure whether to use the ‘insufficiency’ or ‘other’ code for incompetence NOS? Here’s the answer.

ICD-10 is ousting the simplicity of a single code for nonrheumatic mitral valve disorders. Check out the five new options you’ll need to know.

ICD-9-CM Code

424.0, Mitral valve disorders

ICD-10-CM Codes (more…)

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News You Can Use: CMS Clarifies Some Rules Surrounding Usage of ICD-10 Codes

Posted on 12. Nov, 2014 by .

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Review guidelines on how to code when the diagnosis isn’t definite.

Implementation of ICD-10 may have been deferred to October 2015, but the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has stepped up guidance to help you prepare for the new diagnosis coding system. Recently the agency released a transmittal that should help you understand how you’ll report these codes when insurers start requiring them next year.

CMS issued Transmittal 3020 on Aug. 8, and it announces revisions to the official ICD-10 Coding Guidelines which put them more in line with the current ICD-9 rules. For example, CMS revised the ICD-10 regs to now say, “Do not code diagnoses documented as ‘probable,’ ‘suspected,’ ‘questionable,’ ‘rule out,’ or ‘working diagnosis’ or other similar terms indicating uncertainty. Rather, code the condition(s) to the highest degree of certainty for that encounter/visit, such as symptoms, signs, abnormal test results, or other reason for the visit.”

Here’s why: (more…)

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ICD-10: Answer ‘Where?’ for Adenomatous Colon Polyps

Posted on 22. Oct, 2014 by .

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You’ll need more info in 2015.

When your pathologist diagnoses an adenomatous polyp submitted from a colonoscopy, you’ll need to know much more information to choose the proper ICD-10 code.

Make sure you train your pathologists to document the proper details so you can properly code these cases when ICD-10 goes into effect on Oct. 1, 2015.

From One to Many

You just need one code for adenomatous colon polyp under ICD-9: 211.3 (Benign neoplasm of colon). (more…)

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ICD-10: Look for New Contact Dermatitis Codes in 2015

Posted on 08. Oct, 2014 by .

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ICD-10 codes will specify allergic or irritant contacts.

Although the contact dermatitis ICD-9 diagnosis codes were already fairly specific as far as distinguishing different kinds of agents that come in contact with the skin, the ICD-10 diagnosis codes that will come into effect on Oct. 1, 2015, do offer a bit more specificity in some cases. (more…)

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ICD-10: 2 Factors You Can’t Afford to Miss in Your Vertebral Fracture Diagnosis Coding

Posted on 24. Sep, 2014 by .

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Tip: Confirm underlying disease and site before you pick up the right code.

Vertebral fractures are nearly twice as common as other osteoporotic fractures in the wrist or hip, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. Osteoporotic vertebral fractures occur in nearly 700, 000 patients each year – and many of them might see your pain management physician for treatment before or after surgery.

Under ICD-9, you report code 733.13 (Pathological fracture of vertebrae) for pathological fracture of vertebrae. This single ICD-9 code corresponds to several ICD-10 codes that specifically address the underlying cause of the fracture.

Start by Confirming the Cause of Fracture

For an osteoporotic vertebral fracture that occurs due to aging, you report code M80.08XA (Age-related osteoporosis with current pathological fracture, vertebra[e], initial encounter for fracture).

For any other cause of the osteoporotic fracture like (more…)

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